Parkinson’s disease: Three steps forwards and two steps back


Parkinson’s disease: Three steps forwards and two steps back

Old man walking (Photo by Safa Baku0131rcu0131 on Pexels.com)

When I was a student, I met a male nurse walking a patient with Parkinson’s disease to the toilet.

“He is taking ages at the rate he is walking! It’s like taking three steps forward and two steps backward! I told him it would be faster for him to use a urinal on his bed!” Mr. Lee kept quiet at that remark. His mask-like face showed no expression. With a flexed body, he shuffled in a frustratingly slow, yet festinating gait. His thumb and forefinger rubbed in a pin-rolling tremor.

He never wet because he would request to go to the toilet earlier to avoid losing control of his bladder.

A senior walking pass, “Mr. Lee, I see you are walking and exercising. Very good, keep it up!”

Later the senior called a few of us aside, “be careful what you say! For a headmaster, to lose control over his movements can be a depressing condition. He may keep quiet, but he is sharp. He understood what you said! We need to treat patients with dignity and respect!”

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Not long ago, I met a male retired banker in a pottery class with me.

“I have Parkinson’s disease. That’s why I am here!” He was trying to slow down the progression of motor disability. And he was very creative and tidy in his pottery work!

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Research and management of people with Parkinson’s disease have improved a lot since.

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woman making clay pot
pottery work (Photo by Quang Nguyen Vinh on Pexels.com)

8 Comments

  1. Priti says:

    Yes they need to get dignity and respect. Well shared πŸ˜ŠπŸ’“

    Liked by 2 people

  2. vermavkv says:

    nice information..

    Liked by 2 people

  3. c’Γ¨ una tecnologia che aiuta a ridurre i danni di questa patologia https://bit.ly/3EwMvA5

    Liked by 2 people

  4. The banker mentioned was proactive and positive in his approach to accepting his condition! Need to learn from him!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. sure. being proactive is always a great desirable quality, accepting does not mean succumbing and since there are natural remedies to help it is not bad to help yourself to get better. indeed it is an act of sincere love. πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  5. haoyando says:

    Wow, Parkinson’s can be frightening.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. equipsblog says:

    We need to recognize that usually the people that are slowing us down may be doing the best that they can. People ambling across the street perusing their cell phones don’t fall into that category.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. πŸ˜…πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™

      Like

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